Humanity and Insanity

he began to forget the further he went

the way of men he tried hard to resent

and in his solitude, the longer he spent

purpose deprived in the continued acsent

There is something that we must be conscious and careful of as the world moves deeper into the path of technology and innovation. That is, we must never confuse humanity with insanity.

We can imagine a world a hundred years in the future, where we have a new generation born on mars. Many people may own flying cars. There may be explorations being set forth past our solar system, into the great unknown. However, we must never forget what we are. We are humans, first.

We are explorers and crafters, yes. We are inquirers and questioners, always.

But, we are also lovers. We are helpers. We are believers and dreamers. We are passionate. We have fear, and anger. We have sadness too, and it’s okay to feel all of it. It natural to be vulnerable, and feel helpless for a moment. Because when you feel helpless, that’s when we need humanity most. We need the embrace of a friend. When we fall, we can grasp for the hand humanity extends. We must be there for each other.

Will we forget to look fondly at the earth as we soar past our atmosphere? Will love and mercy become a distorted in our minds, as a hurdle we must jump over for success? Will reacting naturally to emotionally stimulating experiences become some sort of psychological anomaly, and therefore looked upon as the real problem? Will the logical operations that run our machines overrun us, and cause us to forget who we truly are at our core? Will we lose our purpose on the way to the stars? If the answer is yes to any of these, that is the insanity that we must fear.

The farther we go, the more we learn, the better we build, we must not forget our home. And our home is this. It’s us. Humans on planet earth.

There will never be a star for us like the sun. And earth will forever be home with its peoples.

a rumination after viewing the motion picture “Ad Astra”

10/20/19

First Song

at first touch, she knew

the keys had chosen her

so she made herself promise

never to forget her first song

when she pressed g and began

her heart knew the rest

the tones of the naturals

filled up her sleepy soul

her fingers felt at home

the melody came effortlessly

her hands didn’t tremble once

and they never could forget

9/26/19

Poetry by Rupi Kaur: A Review

Poetry has always been a style of writing that I loved. I write a bit, but I have always loved reading poetry. To me, it’s a very freeing and vulnerable sort of writing. Poets reveal pieces of their hearts, convey their values and ideas, and express concepts in a often illustrative and touching way.

I have had the pleasure to read Rupi Kaur’s books, “Milk and Honey” and “The Sun and Her Flowers.” Usually, the poetry that I read is much different than Rupi’s. At times, when a poet touches a deeper concept, they don’t write about it directly. They may use figurative language to describe it and leave the reader to decide what it means. Although this style has its charm, it can lead the reader to be a little frustrated if they are not able to comprehend the meaning the poet is trying to express. However, this is not the case with Rupi.

In Kaur’s poetry, she evocatively and vulnerably describes the thoughts and feelings that come with loss, love, abuse, femininity, family, beauty, and identity. She does not hold anything back in her poems, and writes them in a language that is accessible to anyone.

In “Milk and Honey,” she cleverly sections her book into 4 portions: The Hurting, The Loving, The Breaking, and The Healing. In the first portion, she candidly goes into her experiences and feelings of a past abuse, confusion with her identity, objectification, and neglect. In “The Loving“, it dives in with very passionate and colorful poems expressing her feelings of love, and “The Breaking” being the intense pain and desperation that comes with the loss of that love. The last portion, “The Healing,” takes a positive and empowering turn with writings about moving forward after the abuse and failed relationships. I really was found her rawness and authenticity, and how she was able to show how emotions or thoughts aren’t always easy fluid. Sometimes her poems seemed like they were taking a positive turn, but then sometimes it would drop down again to the negative. It would go back and forth at times, like an internal struggle. Her writing style seemed very psychological in that way, and I admired that.

Similarly, in “The Sun and Her Flowers,” she divides this book into five chapters: “Wilting“- which deals with grief, “Falling“- which deals with self-abandonment, “Rooting“- which goes into family struggles and honoring one’s roots, “Rising”– which dives into a new love, and “Blooming“, like “The Healing,” ends the book nicely with positive and empowering messages. I enjoyed this one a little bit more than the first, because I found many of the poems very relatable. However, I found the feminist and immigrant themes very pivotal, especially with the various issues that seem to be dividing the United States currently. Rooting was educational, and I appreciated reading about a her, a child of immigrants, pride and awe of her parents sacrifices that gave her and her siblings the opportunities and freedoms no one in any of their families generations had, specifically women. I really enjoyed reading Rising also, because I was glad seeing her move on to a new love, as scary as that can be. I found myself saying “HA!” at one of the poems where she saw her old boyfriend in the coffee shop and didn’t have a single care. That was definitely a highlight.

I would recommend these books to anyone of a mature mind, especially girls and women. Many of the poems are empowering, and even if this book is taken apart and some specific poems are selected, I think even a young child might appreciate it. However, I believe that both the books in whole are definitely better suited for who are of an reasonable age (16+ maybe), because some of the poems might be disturbing or confusing to a child.

Overall, it was truly a great read, and I am considering buying them so I can read it over and over again. Have you read “Milk and Honey” or “The Sun and Her Flowers”? Tell me what you thought of it!

Below are some of my favorite poems from Rupi, mostly from The Sun and Her Flowers.

8/8/19